Festivities promote unity, they convert unknowns into knowns and bring knowns closer. It increases opportunities for interaction and creativity, and improve our psychology to accept the diversity in race and religion. In short, they create a gleeful aura for human beings to live a little stress-free life. – Anonymous. Don’t go by the sombreness of this quote, the blog is not going to be a serious affair for sure; just like one of our favourite festivals, Holi. This festival of colours is synonymous with the over-enthusiastic celebrations in the pious cities of Mathura, Vrindavan and Barsana. However, what is side-lined are the unconventional ways in which people in several parts of India celebrate this festival of Gulal, Gujiya and Gulab Jamun. Keep reading to know 5 places where the festival is revered in ways different than the usual… Anandpur Sahib

Shutterstock

Hola Mohalla or simply Hola is a 3-day event starting the next day of Holi. Marking the onset of Sikh New Year, during this time the locals, instead of revelling in colours, show their prowess by participating in sword fights, wrestling, and other sports. Nagar kirtan, turban tying and poetry are other forms of celebrating this legacy of Guru Gobind Singh. What to look for: Colours made of real rose flowers Kumaon

euttarakhand.com

The Kumauni Holi is unique in more ways than one. Firstly, the locals celebrate it not only for the fact that it symbolises the victory of good over evil, but also signals the onset of the sowing season. Secondly, it is more of a musical affair for the denizens, when they sing songs based on religion and classical ragas. The different types of Holi celebrated here further add to its uniqueness. Starting from Basant Panchmi (falling in January end or February beginning), Baithki Holi or Nirvan ki Holi, Khari Holi and the Mahila Holi are the three types of Holi that together last for over a month in the region. You will see people merrymaking in white churidar kurta and pyjama accentuated with a nokdaar topi. What to look for: Aloo ke gutke (spiced with jambu); specially prepared for this occasion Goa

Shutterstock

The otherwise party destination of India, Goa is another unusual place to experience the joyful festival of Holi. It is celebrated as Shigmo here from the 11th Moon day till 15th Moon day. You can see revellers clad in colourful dresses and setting out on streets blowing flutes and beating drums. On the final day of this festival also known as ‘Rang Panchami’, people smear each other with gulal and display Goan ethnicity through a parade. The gleeful aura all around will make you fall in love with Goa even more. What to look for: Carnival-like atmosphere with beautifully designed floats Planning to visit Goa this time? Book FabHotel La Flamingo, which is among the most preferred budget hotels in Goa. Rishikesh

Shutterstock

The Adventure Capital of India is the perfect place to head out to this Holi as the festival coincides with the International Yoga Festival (1st – 7th March). This week-long event will be attended by renowned spiritual leaders, saints and devotees from around the globe and will have Yoga sessions, lectures, cultural performances and aarti. Besides, you can also delve into special Holi celebrations, comprising music, gulal, river rafting and scrumptious snacks, organised on the banks of the Ganga River. What to look for: River rafting Pushkar

Shutterstock

Around the glassy Pushkar Lake, the town though is magical throughout the year, the ambience is all the more spellbinding during the festival of colours. You won’t witness much differentness here as in the aforementioned destinations; however, the enthusiasm and fervour with which locals celebrate it for two consecutive days will be really worth capturing. What to look for: Dance congregation in the town centre So, where are you heading? Do mention in the comment box below. Happy & Safe Holi to you all!